The Ketogenic Diet Reduces Fatigue and Depression in MS Patients | City of health Berlin

A ketogenic diet – low in carbohydrates, high in healthy fats, and adequate in protein – reduces fatigue and depression in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). A clinical study demonstrates this.

A ketogenic diet – low in carbohydrates, high in healthy fats, and adequate in protein – reduces fatigue and depression in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). This is demonstrated by a phase II study that examined the tolerability of the nutritional intervention.

Measures of disability and quality of life also improved during the study. However, the researchers pointed out that there are not yet enough efficacy studies to recommend this diet for MS patients outside of carefully monitored clinical trials.

Keto for six months

The research was published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. There were 64 patients, two were teenagers (15 and 17 years old) and the rest were adults. Most were women and white. During the study, they were asked to follow a ketogenic diet for six months.

The participants’ urine was analyzed daily with a test strip to determine if their diet induced ketosis. According to the researchers, anyone who tested positive for ketosis 85% or more of the days had adhered to the diet.

Side Effects Constipation and diarrhea subsided rapidly

Among the participants who completed the study, the most common side effects were constipation (43%), diarrhea (18%), nausea (9%), weight gain (9%), fatigue (5%), worsening of depression or anxiety (5th percentile). percent) and acne (5 percent). Changes in the timing and severity of the period were reported in 27% of the participants who were menstruating.

Two participants dropped out of the study due to side effects, including nausea and loss of appetite. However, about a quarter of the patients experienced no side effects from the diet, and most of those who experienced side effects only experienced them in the first two weeks.

The ketogenic diet reduces fatigue and depression in MS patients

At the same time, there was an almost 50% decrease in the fatigue and depression levels reported by participants while on the ketogenic diet. MS patients also reported significant improvements in physical and mental quality of life.

Reduced mobility decreased, manual dexterity and the ability to walk increased. Average BMI decreased significantly, as did body fat. Levels of the pro-inflammatory hormone leptin decreased, while levels of adiponectin, a hormone with anti-inflammatory effects, increased. “Future research should aim to explore the ketogenic diet as an additional therapeutic approach to managing MS,” concluded the scientists.

Leave a Comment