Businesses grapple with DevOps and still can’t implement it

Software development and business rarely go hand in hand: according to a recent LeanIX study, DevOps and agile ways of working are common in less than half of companies.

The survey looked at five key working methods that apply to teams completely, partially, or not at all. 58% always want to be able to react flexibly to customer needs and have CI / CD pipelines – 37% and 32%, however, believe this only applies to some extent to their company.



Most developers collect data, but from a DevOps perspective they often don’t collect the correct data.

(Image: LeanIX)

However, only 42% of companies follow the DevOps principle that all developers are fully responsible for their code and resulting services in the sense of “code it, distribute it, own it”. Team topologies for employee organization are used by 40%, and only 18% of the teams surveyed can make individual decisions about their technology stack.

These DevOps approaches are usually used, at least in part. However, one finding of the study is that this is not enough: the higher the level of maturity, the easier it is to reduce the manual effort involved in development. Discovering bottlenecks, dismantling silos and using resources efficiently is less difficult. Additionally, 16% instead of 30% of DevOps-savvy participants believe a project doesn’t have a business context.

Finally, the study also records whether IT and management understand each other: only 42% believe that this is the case. LeanIX attributes this to the metrics monitored by the developers, with open support tickets (at 71%) and the number of monthly users in first place (at 66%).



Most developers collect data, but from a DevOps perspective they often don’t collect the correct data.

(Image: LeanIX)

However, much less frequent data would provide a better insight into actual success – only 45% would register if the right features are delivered on time, as the user churn rate is 42%. Just like many developers would look to return on investment and only 38% know how many customers would recommend the product to others.

The four DORA metrics – data intended to determine the performance of a development team – only cover 23 percent completely. However, 24% do not collect them at all, and an isolated look at individual areas is not very significant, according to the study authors. Specifically, the time taken, the speed with which an outage is resolved (55%), and the time it takes from a request to the distribution (63%) are determined less. 77% know the frequency of implementations, which is relatively easier to measure, and 73% know how many of them fail.

On the plus side, 52% of developers rated their “development experience” as good, including 12% who gave it the highest rating. A total of 36% see their work situation as mixed, while 12% think it is negative.

At the beginning of 2022, a total of 172 professionals from around the world took part in the study. 54 percent come from Europe, 27 percent from the United States. With 42%, most of these developers work in a company with 500 to 9999 employees, 32% in a smaller company and 26% in a larger company. Further information on the study can be found on LeanIX.


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